Archive for the Community Partners Category

Children’s Aid Societies Welcome OHRC Report, Take Action to Combat Over-representation in Child Welfare

The Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) and Children’s Aid Societies (CASs) welcome the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s report, Interrupted childhoods: Over-representation of Indigenous and Black children in Ontario child welfare. The report shines a light on the complex and multi-faceted issues that have contributed to […]

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Budget invests in vulnerable children and families, but child welfare largely left out

A significant investment of $2.1 billion over four years to improve access to mental health care and addiction services in yesterday’s budget is good news for many families involved with child welfare in Ontario. Nearly half of families receive services from children’s aid because of adult mental […]

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Providing culturally appropriate child and family services for Indigenous children

This month, the pre-designated Waabnoong Bemjiwang Child Well-Being Agency held an official project launch. As one of four pre-designated Indigenous Child and Family Well-Being Agencies, Waabnoong Bemjiwang will eventually provide child protection services to seven communities in the Sudbury, Nipissing and Parry Sound areas: Wasauksing, Shawanaga, Magnetawan, […]

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One Vision One Voice Officially Launches Phase II

  After months of planning, Phase II of the One Vision One Voice project is officially underway. The goal of Phase II is to work with societies towards achieving child welfare service excellence and eliminate disproportionate and disparate outcomes of African Canadians involved in the child welfare […]

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Ontario raises age of protection for youth from 16 to 18

As of January 1st, 16 and 17 year-olds in Ontario are finally eligible to receive protection services from Children’s Aid Societies. OACAS and Children Aid Societies have advocated for over two decades for this important change. This new age group will engage with Children’s Aid Societies on […]

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Toronto region remains the child poverty capital of the country

The Toronto region remains the child poverty capital of the country, a new report released this month finds. Unequal City, developed by Toronto CAS and key community partners—Social Planning Toronto, Colour of Poverty Network, Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants, and  Campaign 2000 to End Child Poverty—illuminates […]

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5 reasons why the Children’s Mental Health Organization #kidscantwait letter to Premier Kathleen Wynne matters to Child Welfare

  The Children’s Mental Health Organization (CMHO) has launched a letter writing campaign to improve mental health services for children and youth in Ontario. Here are five reasons why the CMHO Kids Can’t Wait advocacy campaign is important for the child welfare sector: Children served by CAS […]

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Child Welfare Apologizes to Indigenous Families and Communities

On October 1-3, 2017, OACAS hosted a gathering called “A Moment on the Path” at Geneva Park and Rama First Nation to acknowledge and apologize for the harmful role child welfare has played historically, and continues to play, in the lives of Ontario Indigenous children, families, and […]

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DRESS PURPLE DAY 2017: OACAS and CASs work with schools to raise awareness about child abuse prevention

On October 24, 2017, OACAS, Children’s Aid Societies (CASs), and key partners marked Child Abuse Prevention Month with a provincial DRESS PURPLE DAY to raise awareness about how it takes a village to keep kids safe. Click on the campaign Twitter hashtags #IBREAKtheSilence and #SpeakUp4Kids to see […]

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“It takes a village to keep kids safe.”

This article was originally published in Bancroft This Week. Reprinted with permission. As we make our way through October, we recognize the 25th annual Child Abuse Prevention Month. We recognize that in a perfect world, every child would have a safe, loving home and family, who could […]

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