Archive for the Aboriginal Services Category

Chantal Leduc, a child protection worker, explains how using AOP (anti-oppressive practice) and sharing power with families can make all the difference to their experience and outcomes

  What does anti-oppressive practice (AOP) mean in child welfare? The theory of anti-oppression helps examine the use and misuse of power at the individual, organizational, and systems levels so that families can receive child welfare services in an equitable way. It also recognizes that families can

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Kike Ojo, Program Manager for One Vision One Voice, reflects on the Anti-Oppression Round Table’s 10th anniversary

  When I first started working in child welfare it wasn’t uncommon to hear members of the sector say that “they don’t see colour,” or that they treat all families “the same,” despite the grave disparities pointing to the contrary. All these years later, that thought process

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6 reasons why Anti-Oppressive (AO) practice is critical for child welfare in Ontario

1. Problem: The Child, Youth and Family Services Act grants Children’s Aid Societies substantial power through legislation. Solution: Working from an anti-oppressive lens encourages child welfare professionals to be mindful of this power and to reflect on how this power can be shared with children, youth, and

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Budget invests in vulnerable children and families, but child welfare largely left out

A significant investment of $2.1 billion over four years to improve access to mental health care and addiction services in yesterday’s budget is good news for many families involved with child welfare in Ontario. Nearly half of families receive services from children’s aid because of adult mental

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Emergency Summit on Indigenous Child Welfare in Canada

A Conversation with OACAS CEO, Mary Ballantyne, and Director of Indigenous Services, Karen Hill The federal minister of Indigenous Services, Jane Philpott, called for an emergency summit to be held last month to address the current situation in Indigenous child welfare, which she has likened the horrors

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Providing culturally appropriate child and family services for Indigenous children

This month, the pre-designated Waabnoong Bemjiwang Child Well-Being Agency held an official project launch. As one of four pre-designated Indigenous Child and Family Well-Being Agencies, Waabnoong Bemjiwang will eventually provide child protection services to seven communities in the Sudbury, Nipissing and Parry Sound areas: Wasauksing, Shawanaga, Magnetawan,

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Child Welfare Apologizes to Indigenous Families and Communities

On October 1-3, 2017, OACAS hosted a gathering called “A Moment on the Path” at Geneva Park and Rama First Nation to acknowledge and apologize for the harmful role child welfare has played historically, and continues to play, in the lives of Ontario Indigenous children, families, and

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An Indigenous perspective on the Child Abuse Prevention Month campaign from Kenn Richard, Executive Director of Native Child and Family Services

What insights can an Indigenous perspective contribute to our annual Child Abuse Prevention Month campaign? The word child abuse implies that there is a wicked mother step-mother behind it. I wish it were that simple. What is really behind child abuse is a number of factors that

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How kinship families are improving child welfare outcomes for children and families in Ontario

Sharon Cabrera, Kin Supervisor at the Children’s Aid Society of Toronto, shares how kinship families help keep kids connected What does child welfare mean by kinship? We’re talking about a living arrangement in which a relative, community member, or anybody else who has a connection to a

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4 things you should know about the child welfare sector’s commitments to Reconciliation

And how they are shaping the sector’s priorities with Indigenous communities going forward 1. Every Children’s Aid Society has committed to tangible Reconciliation actions. On June 6, 2017, the Ontario child welfare sector unanimously agreed to prioritize Reconciliation with Indigenous communities through nine key commitments.

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